Home » Key Stem Cells Research Articles » Regeneration of Aplysia bag cell neurons is synergistically enhanced by substrate-bound hemolymph proteins and laminin

Regeneration of Aplysia bag cell neurons is synergistically enhanced by substrate-bound hemolymph proteins and laminin

Regeneration of Aplysia Bag Cell Neurons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure legend:

Aplysia bag cell neuron grown on a glass substrate coated with ​laminin and Aplysia hemolymph compared to a bag cell grown on a substrate coated with only laminin (inset). Cells are stained with mouse anti-alpha-tubulin primary and Alexa 488 goat anti-mouse secondary antibodies. Scale bar is 100 microns and applies to both images.

Journal Reference

Hyland C1, Dufresne ER2, Forscher P1.

Sci Rep. 2014 Apr 11;4:4617.

1Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520.

2Departments of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Physics, and Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520.

 

Abstract

 

We have investigated Aplysia hemolymph as a source of endogenous factors to promote regeneration of bag cell neurons. We describe a novel synergistic effect between substrate-bound hemolymph proteins and laminin. This combination increased outgrowth and branching relative to eitherlaminin or hemolymph alone. Notably, the addition of hemolymph to laminin substrates accelerated growth cone migration rate over ten-fold. Our results indicate that the active factor is either a high molecular weight protein or protein complex and is not the respiratory protein hemocyanin.Substrate-bound factor(s) from central nervous system-conditioned media also had a synergistic effect with laminin, suggesting a possible cooperation between humoral proteins and nervous system extracellular matrix. Further molecular characterization of active factors and their cellular targets is warranted on account of the magnitude of the effects reported here and their potential relevance for nervous system repair.

Go To PubMed