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A whole-cell electrochemical biosensing system based on bacterial inward electron flow for fumarate quantification

Significance Statement

Early diagnosis of cancer is one of the primary objectives of cancer research initiatives, which generally means more opportunities for therapy. Therefore, sensitive and simple detection methods for cancer biomarker are of great interest to researchers. In this work, the researchers developed a novel whole-cell based bioelectrochemical biosensing platform. It was also successfully demonstrated for fast, reliable and sensitive quantification of cancer biomarker. The key component of this platform is consisting of an exoelectrogenic bacteria-Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which directly generate an electric response towards the cancer biomarker (e.g., fumarate). As this electrochemical reaction was occurred at the bacterial periplasm and was catalyzed by bacterial enzyme, this biosensing platform is very robust, and highly specific to the analyte. More impressively, this platform has its unique property of whole-cell system-providing the information of bioavailability. Last but not the least, this biosensing platform only equipped with a simple instrument (potentiostat) that ensured it with impressive properties such as low cost, and even maintenance free. Such whole-cell bioelectrochemical sensing system adds new dimensions to bioelectrochemical biosensors and provides new ways to early diagnosis.

electrochemical biosensing system bacterial inward electron flow fumarate quantification- global medical discovery

Journal Reference

Biosens Bioelectron. 2015 Jun 15;68:34-40.

Si RW1, Zhai DD2, Liao ZH1, Gao L1, Yong YC3.

Show Affiliations
  1. Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu Province, China.
  2. Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu Province, China; College of Biological Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan Province, China.
  3. Biofuels Institute, School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu Province, China. Electronic address: [email protected]

Abstract

Fumarate is of great importance as it is an oncometabolite as well as food spoilage indicator. However, cost-effective and fast quantification method for fumarate is lacking although it is urgently required. This work developed an electrochemical whole-cell biosensing system for fumarate quantification. A sensitive inwards electric output (electron flow from electrode into bacteria) responded to fumarate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was characterized, and an electrochemical fumarate biosensing system was developed without genetic engineering. The biosensing systemdelivered symmetric current peak immediately upon fumarate addition, where the peak area increased in proportion to the increasing fumarate concentration with a wide range of 2 μM-10 mM (R(2)=0.9997). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.83 μM and 1.2 μM, respectively. This biosensing system displayed remarkable specificity to fumarate against other possible interferences. It was also successfully applied to samples of apple juice and kidney tissue. This study added new dimension to electrochemical biosensor design, and provide a simple, cost-effective, fast and robust tool for fumarate quantification.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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About The Author

Rong-Wei Si is a Master student at Jiangsu University, China. He is working on microbial fuel cells based biosensors

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About The Author

Dr. Dan-Dan Zhai is a Lecturer of Henan University of Technology, China. She is also working as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Jiangsu University. She received the Ph.D. degree from East China University of Science & Technology. Her research interests include pharmaceuticals and biosensors.

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About The Author

Zhi-Hong Liao is a Master student at Jiangsu University, China. She is working on microbial fuel cells.

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About The Author

Dr. Lu Gao is a Research Assistant of biofuels institute of Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, China. She received the Ph. D. degree from Nanjing Agricultural University, and then worked as a research fellow in The University of Tokyo. One of her research interests is toxicology of environmental factors.

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About The Author

Prof. Dr. Yang-Chun Yong is a Professor of School of Environment and Safety Engineering at Jiangsu University, China. He received his Ph.D. degree from East China University of Science & Technology, and then worked as a Research Fellow in Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) before he joined Jiangsu University. One of his research interests is the development of novel biosensing system/intelligent devices for various applications including early diagnosis of human diseases. Our website: http://bioeng.ujs.edu.cn/pub/cms.

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