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MicroRNAs 185, 96, and 223 repress selective high-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake through post-transcriptional inhibition

MicroRNAs 185, 96, and 223 Repress Selective High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Uptake through Posttranscriptional Inhibition

Journal Reference

Wang L, Jia XJ, Jiang HJ, Du Y, Yang F, Si SY, Hong B.

Mol Cell Biol. 2013 May;33(10):1956-64.

Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.

 

Abstract

 

Hepatic scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) plays an important role in selective high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) uptake, which is a pivotal step of reverse cholesterol transport. In this study, the potential involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in posttranscriptional regulation of hepatic SR-BI and selective HDL-C uptake was investigated. The level of SR-BI expression was repressed by miRNA 185 (miR-185), miR-96, and miR-223, while the uptake of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-HDL was decreased by 31.9% (P < 0.001), 23.9% (P < 0.05), and 15.4% (P < 0.05), respectively, in HepG2 cells. The inhibition of these miRNAs by their anti-miRNAs had opposite effects in these hepatic cells. The critical effect of miR-185 was further validated by the loss of regulation in constructs with mutated miR-185 target sites. In addition, these miRNAs directly targeted the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of SR-BI with a coordinated effect. Interestingly, the decrease of miR-96 and miR-185coincided with the increase of SR-BI in the livers of ApoE KO mice on a high-fat diet. These data suggest that miR-185, miR-96, and miR-223 mayrepress selective HDL-C uptake through the inhibition of SR-BI in human hepatic cells, implying a novel mode of regulation of hepatic SR-BI and an important role of miRNAs in modulating cholesterol metabolism.

 

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